Let Us End The Drought!

So…I have been missing in action for quite the while now. I promise you I have not just been ignoring you lovely readers. I have a few valid reasons (not excuses).

New Company, More Work

The last few months have seen me literally swamped with administrative work as I sought to not only recreate my business’ identity, but also to put in place all those things which are required by law to get it started. If anyone here has ever done business with any government I am sure you feel my pain.

Panal Creative

For those of you who happen to be on my Facebook page you will know that I ran a campaign about the social media launch of my new company Panal Creative. While I was running that campaign and working out contracts and all that I was also redesigning the look of the company. I decided to move away from the usual “Blah blah designs” and to find something a little more…creative. What I found was Panal Creative. Panal means honeycomb, so essentially we are the source of sweet corporate designs.

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We had some good times…but we must embrace the change

Of course you know that we had to recreate the logo for the company while still maintaining some semblance of familiarity and so we came up with this little gem. Continue reading

Persuasion is an Art: Master it! (Part 7)

This is the seventh part in a ten part series of mini articles about persuasion and the mastering of the art. If you were unfortunate enough to miss the first article, you can find it here.

Use “We”

Ok, I’d really like to know who commissioned this study but there have been studies which show that you if you use the word ‘we’ it is a sort of assurance which persuades individuals to make compromises. Seriously? You had to do a study for that?

Anyone who has been in sales or marketing for more than a week knows that if you are pitching anyone you would use we in order to let them know that you are taking on the project not simply as a contractor, but that you are adopting the project as your own. In essence you are telling them that you belong to the group and support their cause.

Basically, when you utilize this option you are telling your prospect, “Hey, let’s work through this together and see what we can achieve.” Sounds much better than “Here’s what I will do and then you can do this.” Doesn’t it?

Persuasion is an Art: Master it! (Part 6)

This is the sixth part in a ten part series of mini articles about persuasion and the mastering of the art. If you were unfortunate enough to miss the first article, you can find it here.

Make Them Laugh

I know you’ve heard in the movies when they say if you can make a girl laugh you can make her do anything….or something along that line. Yes you’re in the right place and no I will not be talking about the complications of love. That same effect that laughing is said to have on persons of the opposite sex, is the same effect that it has on clients (usually).

If you are looking to be more persuasive when selling your concepts, work on that sense of humour. Did you know that if you can get a person to laugh along with you, they like you better and this will then cause them to be more receptive to your awesome ideas?

It is also of interest to note that if you can get a person to laugh at a particular point you make, they are actually giving that point a sense of validity. It is said that persons only laugh at things when they are able to identify with them.

So, if you are an uptight person, try to relax a bit, it not only helps with pitches but also interviews, I rarely do them, but when I do I guarantee I will get the interviewer to laugh, which then allows me to take control of the interview and steer it down a path of my choosing. It is the same with pitches.

In conclusion, laughter really is the best medicine. Prescribe some to your clients today.

Persuasion is an Art: Master it! (Part 5)

Persuasion is an Art: Master it!

This is the (hopefully) long awaited fifth part in a ten part series of mini articles about persuasion and the mastering of the art. If you were unfortunate enough to miss the first article, you can find it here.

Over-Ask

For some strange reason, people feel a bit guilty when they have to refuse a request (most people anyways, like any good rule there are exceptions). So just in case you know you’re dealing with a tough client who tends to say no, instead of getting straight to the point and requesting what you want, you can request something else, so when that request is denied, then you offer your real request as a sort of option to the first. This gives the client the feeling that they have a freedom of choice, like the second option is an escape route.

This will leave them feeling relieved and of course you will end up getting what you were gunning for in the first place.

Remember if the second request is something they can comply with without worries, they will grab the chance.

P.S On the off chance that they accept the first request, please ensure that it is something that you can also work with to achieve the goals they are looking to hire you to achieve. Do not overshoot and under-deliver.

Persuasion is an Art: Master it (Part 4)

This is the fourth part in a ten part series of mini articles about persuasion and the mastering of the art. If you were unfortunate enough to miss the first article, you can find it here.

Give First

This is something I’m definitely guilty of. Almost all my clients can tell you I’ve done some pro bono (always loved how that sounds) work for them at some point in time. But I’m not the focus here, you are, let’s get back on point.

Did you know, that persons are psychologically set up to return favours? We see this in our everyday life all along, we just never noticed. If you don’t believe me, next time you go out with friends, buy the first round of drinks and see what happens….

When you are pitching a proposal, if you can think of any ways you can pitch in a little extra for the client go right ahead and do that! Think of that initial good deed as an investment on which the interest to be paid would be you getting that project you are pitching for.

After you make this investment, if it is a good one, the client will in turn feel a force compelling them to do a good deed for you as well (in this case giving you that proposal. Genius!

Persuasion is an Art: Master it! (Part 3)

This is the third part in a ten part series of mini articles about persuasion and the mastering of the art. If you were unfortunate enough to miss the first article, you can find it here.

Stress Their Loss

Did you know that you are more easily persuaded by what you stand to lose than what you stand to gain? Me either, but after some careful analysis I’ve come to agree with that statement. If for example you are pitching a client, take note of when their ears perk up. It isn’t when you tell them of the immense gains they stand to make. No sir, it is when you mention potential losses, that’s when you get prospective and basically anybody’s attention.

Not saying that you should build your pitch solely on their losses because that would be pointless and counterintuitive. What you should instead do is to seek to base your pitch/argument on both the gains and losses the client stands to make if they decide to use your services or not.

Remember “We’re more persuaded by the thought of losing something than the thought of gaining,”.

That’s why offers, [regardless of how long the period of time allotted] are always said to be limited time offers.

Persuasion is an Art: Master it! (Part 2)

This is the second part in a ten part series of mini articles about persuasion and the mastering of the art. If you were unfortunate enough to miss the first article, you can find it here.

Help Them Imagine

If you want to really get your client’s attention paint a vivid image in their minds (you are creative so I know this should be easy). For example, when speaking to them don’t just say what you’ll do, you should help them to imagine the pleasure to be had if they go along with you, or the ‘pain’ they will experience for not heeding your kind words of wisdom. You are the creative consultant, show them why they came to you in the first place.

Remember you already did your research, so you are already aware of their needs and wants. You should have all the ammunition that you need to get them to play the game that you want them to play. Now all you need to do is to help them imagine.